Meow and Somesuch

Cat pictures, food I cook with hints how to make it, and somesuch.
2 | 2.9.2014 | 40 minutes ago


0 | 2.9.2014 | 45 minutes ago


0 | 2.9.2014 | 1 hour ago


Forget Lightning Returns, the Pink Dragoon has arrived!

0 | 2.9.2014 | 1 hour ago


8 | 2.9.2014 | 1 hour ago


I’m so angry

bioandrunaway:

nephriel:

bioandrunaway:

Why aren’t kinder eggs sold here this is fucked up man, this is really fucked up.

My car got searched last time I came over the border (cause I look like the kind of person who would smuggle drugs) and they confiscated 3 melted as fuck kinder eggs I couldn’t even believe it.

The only proper way to smuggle kinder eggs into the country is by stuffing them in your cheeks like a gerbil.

HAMSTER

0 | 2.9.2014 | 1 hour ago


So I didn’t get yellow this time.

So I didn’t get yellow this time.

10 | 2.9.2014 | 14 hours ago


kihaku-gato:

lilkittay:

kihaku-gato:

lilkittay:

The castor bean plant in all its spiky glory.

I planted it late, from a small, rootbound cup. Alas, the short growing season did not allow it to become massive and glorious.

If I get the opportunity to grow these plants again, they will get their own planters with premium soil and lots of love.

It would also be nice if the neighbor kids didn’t destroy them next time.

Maybe you’ll get lucky and your plant will set seed in time before the first frost so you can do it again!

Are they capable of self-pollination? The pollen is long gone, it was below the big spiky lady plant parts. I tried to kinda sprinkle some of it up there, but I think the aphid-farming ants probably tracked some around too. I dunno, I suppose we’ll see ^^

If what I have seen on google is true, yes they are very much self-pollinating. Seems that the flowers are generally wind-pollinated according to what I read. I have my fingers crossed for you that yours goes to seed!

Welp, they’re at that pretty red spikey stage, hopefully they turn brown before frost. We have a month at the least, two at the most, until the first frosts. If they can grow and perpetuate these in MINNESOTA, they certainly should be able to do the same here. ;D

10 | 1.9.2014 | 15 hours ago


kihaku-gato:

lilkittay:

The castor bean plant in all its spiky glory.

I planted it late, from a small, rootbound cup. Alas, the short growing season did not allow it to become massive and glorious.

If I get the opportunity to grow these plants again, they will get their own planters with premium soil and lots of love.

It would also be nice if the neighbor kids didn’t destroy them next time.

Maybe you’ll get lucky and your plant will set seed in time before the first frost so you can do it again!

Are they capable of self-pollination? The pollen is long gone, it was below the big spiky lady plant parts. I tried to kinda sprinkle some of it up there, but I think the aphid-farming ants probably tracked some around too. I dunno, I suppose we’ll see ^^

336031 | 1.9.2014 | 16 hours ago


itlooksgoodfromouterspace:

iwonderhowlongicanmakemyusername:

I love this comics

I’M GONNA BUILD A DECK

(via itwasarunbyfruiting)

7 | 1.9.2014 | 17 hours ago


Jade Gone Wild!
Well, almost. These jade plants were the leftover cuttings taken from my monstrous jade plant when I pruned it in spring. The thing was tipping over under its own weight. Already overburdened with too many spider, pothos, African violet, dracaena and other plants, I really didn’t feel inclined to do something with the cuttings. So I let them sit on my kitchen table near my African violets for a month. They sort of sat there, like vegetables, not really doing much. They looked a little flaccid, and started to grow rootlets.
At some point, I grew tired of looking at them, so I tossed them outside by my castor bean plant and the catnip plant. Sort of in the “no-plant’s-land”—the area I send plants to survive on their own (even though I still water them and stuff).
For the longest time they looked the same, flaccid and dull. Then, suddenly, like magic, they turned into beautiful jade plants again.
Now I feel compelled to dig them up and bring them in for the winter. Maybe I can pawn them off on a friend or a relative or something. >.>

Jade Gone Wild!

Well, almost. These jade plants were the leftover cuttings taken from my monstrous jade plant when I pruned it in spring. The thing was tipping over under its own weight. Already overburdened with too many spider, pothos, African violet, dracaena and other plants, I really didn’t feel inclined to do something with the cuttings. So I let them sit on my kitchen table near my African violets for a month. They sort of sat there, like vegetables, not really doing much. They looked a little flaccid, and started to grow rootlets.

At some point, I grew tired of looking at them, so I tossed them outside by my castor bean plant and the catnip plant. Sort of in the “no-plant’s-land”—the area I send plants to survive on their own (even though I still water them and stuff).

For the longest time they looked the same, flaccid and dull. Then, suddenly, like magic, they turned into beautiful jade plants again.

Now I feel compelled to dig them up and bring them in for the winter. Maybe I can pawn them off on a friend or a relative or something. >.>

10 | 1.9.2014 | 17 hours ago


The castor bean plant in all its spiky glory.

I planted it late, from a small, rootbound cup. Alas, the short growing season did not allow it to become massive and glorious.

If I get the opportunity to grow these plants again, they will get their own planters with premium soil and lots of love.

It would also be nice if the neighbor kids didn’t destroy them next time.

5 | 1.9.2014 | 17 hours ago


The marigolds are responding well to the dressing of fresh potting soil and fertilizer they received coupled with the increased rainfall and less-sweltering temperatures.

They’ve grown in the soil-y cracks of the ancient railroad ties turned landscaping retaining walls quite tenaciously.

Much of their previous tired-out looking purple and miscolored foliage has been replaced with fresh, green foliage.

They should make it through to frost just fine =)

6 | 1.9.2014 | 18 hours ago


The annual wildflower patch (intended to attract bees and butterflies?) is entering its final phase, with the huge marigolds dominating the scene.

Next year will see an expansion of this patch, with sunflowers thrown in. Probably just sunflower seeds from my bird seed, since these would be the most useful to local critters anyway.

I also plan to make a big empty mulched space around the rose bush (granted that it survives the winter) because it was smothered by the wildflowers and stopped growing/blooming.